Leave No Trace
Leave No Trace is an internationally recognized outdoor skills and ethics educational program from The Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics.  The BSA has embraced the LNT program as the core methodology of its Outdoor Ethics program because it provides a strong, science-based set of tools and concrete actions that we can use to apply the Outdoor Code to Scounting's fundamental outdoor activities.  Since Scouting and Venturing are about personal responsibility, leadership and making good choices, by practicing Leave No Trace, we take responsbility for our own impacts, provide leadership to those around us by reducing their impacts by making good choices, and we work together to help preserve and conserve our environmental heritage.  Leave No Trace is best understood not as a set of rules and regulations, but as an educational and ethical program for the Backcountry (remote wilderness, Philmont and Northern Tier) and the Frontcountry (open space trails, city, county and state parks, established campgrounds and scout camps).
Backcountry Principles

Plan Ahead and Prepare

Know the regulations and special concerns for the area you'll visit. Prepare for extreme weather, hazards, and emergencies. Schedule your trip to avoid times of high use. Visit in small groups when possible. Consider splitting larger groups into smaller groups. Repackage food to minimize waste. Use a map and compass to eliminate the use of marking paint, rock cairns or flagging.

Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces

Durable surfaces include established trails and campsites, rock, gravel, dry grasses or snow. Protect riparian areas by camping at least 200 feet from lakes and streams. Good campsites are found, not made. Altering a site is not necessary. In popular areas: Concentrate use on existing trails and campsites. Walk single file in the middle of the trail, even when wet or muddy. Keep campsites small. Focus activity in areas where vegetation is absent. In pristine areas: Disperse use to prevent the creation of campsites and trails. Avoid places where impacts are just beginning.

Dispose of Waste Properly

Pack it in, pack it out. Inspect your campsite and rest areas for trash or spilled foods. Pack out all trash, leftover food and litter. Deposit solid human waste in catholes dug 6 to 8 inches deep, at least 200 feet from water, camp and trails. Cover and disguise the cathole when finished. Pack out toilet paper and hygiene products. To wash yourself or your dishes, carry water 200 feet away from streams or lakes and use small amounts of biodegradable soap. Scatter strained dishwater.

Leave What You Find

Preserve the past: examine, but do not touch cultural or historic structures and artifacts. Leave rocks, plants and other natural objects as you find them. Avoid introducing or transporting non-native species. Do not build structures, furniture, or dig trenches.

Minimize Campfire Impacts

Campfires can cause lasting impacts to the backcountry. Use a lightweight stove for cooking and enjoy a candle lantern for light. Where fires are permitted, use established fire rings, fire pans, or mound fires. Keep fires small. Only use sticks from the ground that can be broken by hand. Burn all wood and coals to ash, put out campfires completely, then scatter cool ashes.

Respect Wildlife

Observe wildlife from a distance. Do not follow or approach them. Never feed animals. Feeding wildlife damages their health, alters natural behaviors, and exposes them to predators and other dangers. Protect wildlife and your food by storing rations and trash securely. Control pets at all times, or leave them at home. Avoid wildlife during sensitive times: mating, nesting, raising young, or winter.

Be Considerate of Other Visitors

Respect other visitors and protect the quality of their experience. Be courteous. Yield to other users on the trail. Step to the downhill side of the trail when encountering pack stock. Take breaks and camp away from trails and other visitors. Let nature's sounds prevail. Avoid loud voices and noises.


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Frontcountry Principles
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Know Before You Go

Be prepared!  Remember food and water, and clothes to protect you from the cold, heat and rain.  Use maps to plan where your're going.  Check them along the way so you'll stay on course and won't get lost.  Remember to bring a leash for your pet and plastic bags to pick up your pet's wase.  Learn about the areas you plan to visit.  Read books. check online and talk to people before you go.  The more you know, the more fun you'll have.

Stick To Trails and Camp Overnight Right

Walk and ride on designated trails to protect trailside plants.  Do not step on flowers or small trees.  Once damaged, they may not grow back.  Respect private property by staying on designate trails.  Camp only on existing or designated campsites to avoid damaging vegetation.  Good campsites are found, not made.  Don't dig trenches or build structures in your campsite.

Trash Your Trash and Pick Up Poop

Pack it in, pack it out. Put litter - even crumbs, peels and cores - in garbage bags and carry it home.  Use bathrooms or latrines when available.  If not available, bury human waste in a small hole 6-8 inches deep and 200 feet or 70 big steps from water or the trail.  Use a plastic bag to pack out your pet's poop to a garbage can.  Keep water clean.  Do not put soap, food, or human or pet waste in lakes or streams.

Leave It As You Find It

Leave plants, rocks and historial items as you find them so others can enjoy them.  Treat living plants with respect.  Carving, hacking or peeling plants kills them.

Be Careful With Fire

Use a camp stove for cooking.  Stoves are easier to cook on and create less impact than fire.  If you want to have a campfire, be sure it's permitted and safe to build a fire in the area your'e visiting.  Use only existing fire rings to protect the ground from heat.  Keep you fire small.  Remember, a campfire isn't a garbage can.  Pack out all trash and food.  Firewood should be either bought from a local vendor or gatherered on site if allowed.  Don't bring firewood from home - it can harbor tree killing insects and diseases.  Many states regulate the movement of untreated firewood.  Before gathering any firewood, check local regulations.  Burn all wood to ash and be sure the fire is completely out and cold before you leave.

Keep Wildlife Wild

Observe wildlife from a distance and never approach, feed or follow them.  Human food is unhealthy for all wildlife and feeding them starts bad habits.  Protect wildlife and your food by securely storing your meals and trash.

Share Our Trails and Manage Your Pet

Be considerate when passing others on the trail.  Keep you pet under control to protect it, other visitors and wildlife.  Listen to hature.  Avoid making loud noises or yelling.  You will see more wildlife if you are quiet.  Be sure the fun you have outdoors does not bother anyone else.  Remember, the other visitors are there to enjoy the outdoors too.

 

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Leave No Trace for Kids
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Know Before You Go

Be prepared!  Bring clothes to protect you from cold, heat or rain.  Use maps to show you where you'll be going and so you won't get lost.  Learn about the areas you visit.  Read books and talk to people before you go.  The more you know, the more FUN you'll have.

Choose The Right Path

Stay on the main trail to protect natue and keep from wandering off by yourself.  Steer clear of flowers or small trees.  Once hurt, they may not grow back! Use existing camp areas - camp at least 100 big steps from roads, trails and water.

Trash Your Trash

Pack It In, Pack It Out.  Put litter, even crumbs, in trash cans or carry it home.  Use bathrooms or outhouses (latrines) when available.  If you have to "go," act like a cat and bury poop in a small hole 4-8 inches deep and 100 big steps from water.  Place your toilet paper in a plastic bag and put the bag in the garbage can back home.  Keep water clean.  Keep soap, food, and poop out of lakes and streams.

Leave What You Find

Leave plants, rocks and historical items as you find them so the next person can enjoy them.  Treat living plants with respect.  Hacking or peeling plants can kill them.  Good campsites are found, not made.  Avoid digging trenches or building structures in your campsite.

Be Careful With Fire

Use a camp stove for cooking.  It's easier to cook on and clean up than a fire.  Be sure it's OK to build a campfire in the area that you're visiting.  Use an existing fire ring to protect the ground from heat.  Keep your fire small.  Rememer, campfires aren't for trash or food.  Avoid snapping branches off live, dead, or downed trees.  Instead, collect loose sticks from the ground.  Burn all wood to ash and be sure that the fire is completely out and cold before you leave.

Respect Wildlife

Observe animals from a distance and never approach, feed or follow them.  Human food is unhealthy for all animals and feeding them starts bad habits. Protect wildlife and your food by storing your meals and trash.  Control pets at all times, or leave them at home.

Be Kind To Other Visitors

Make sure the FUN you have in the outdoors does not bother anyone else.  Remember that other visitors are there to enjoy the outdoors.  Listen to nature. Avoid making loud noises or yelling.  You will see more animals if you are quiet.

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